Weekly Rewind: Most Connected TVs Are Unplugged

By Adam Sewall on Feb 24 2012 at 8:00 AM

Turns out, very few people know how to connect their smart TVs to the Internet. Rabbit ears are making a comeback. Amazon Prime Instant Video blew out its first candle. All that and more in your weekly rewind.

Your parents might have bought a connected TV recently, but that doesn't mean they know how to use it. A new research report from NPD In-Stat found only 47 percent of connected TV owners have their sets connected to the Web. Or as Gizmodo declared in a headline: "Everyone Wants a Dumb TV After All."

Meanwhile, even as analysts are expecting leaps and bounds in connected TV sales, rabbit ears are making a comeback. TV-antenna sellers are reporting soaring sales.

Amazon Prime Instant Video celebrated its first birthday earlier this week. The service launched with about 5,000 titles and now includes more than 15,000.

Dish Network's fourth quarter earnings increased 24 percent, fueled by a reversal of subscriber losses in previous quarters. The network ended the year with 13.97 million subscribers, down 166,000.

Armed and ready to take Netflix on, Comcast is rolling out an on-demand streaming service called Xfinity Streampix for premium subscribers who bundle several services together, or an additional $4.99 for subscribers of basic packages. The cable operator said it doesn't have plans to make Streampix available as a standalone service.

Netflix has announced an exclusive multi-year agreement with The Weinstein Company, which includes titles such as "The Artist," which leads in Academy Awards nominations with 17 nods.

Canoe Ventures, a three-year effort among the six largest cable operators, is folding its interactive television advertising business in New York, cutting its 150-person staff by 120 employees. The cable operators -- including Comcast, Time Warner and Cox Communications -- had hoped the interactive technology could help marketers better target ads.

Are you a member of Team Coco? Then you'll be glad to know Conan on TBS has launched its second-screen tablet app, making it the first late-night show to do so.

READ THESE NEXT

Connected TVs & Devices
Report: Installed Internet-connected TVs, devices to top 238M by 2019
Dec 19 2016 8:15 AM

The number of devices connected to the Internet and capable of delivering apps to TV screens is expected to grow 59% by 2019, totaling more than 238 million devices. Connected TVs are forecast to drive 45 percent of the growth over the coming four years, while less expensive, content-heavy streaming media players are projected to drive 35 percent growth.

2020 Vision: Connected TV HHs to near 98M by decade’s end
Connected TVs & Devices
2020 Vision: Connected TV HHs to near 98M by decade’s end
Nov 22 2016 12:45 PM

Connected TV growth in the United States is expected to track at a nearly 2.7% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) through 2020, slower than the growth rate for almost every other streaming media player available, indicating that households will have multiple devices available for watching online video.

In a new report, eMarketer forecast that connected TV users will top 181.8 million users in the U.S., increasing to 202.1 million by 2020.

52% of Millennials eager to use 4K/UHD streaming
Millennials, Connected TVs & Devices, UHD
52% of Millennials eager to use 4K/UHD streaming
Nov 22 2016 7:15 AM

A new study says U.S. households have an average of eight connected devices, and said a third (32%) of homes have at least one streaming media player connected to the Internet, a modest increase of about 7 million homes over a year ago.

That penetration is likely to increase the number of consumers interested in streaming 4K UHD content, but the large number of connected devices could put a strain on the home network’s ability to handle 4K content delivery.

Connected TVs & Devices, Operators
Bell Fibe TV becomes 1st Canadian pay-TV service on Apple TV
Nov 07 2016 7:30 AM

Canadian telco Bell Canada is making its IPTV product, Bell Fibe, available on Apple TV, making it the first pay-TV service from the Great White North to be available on the device.